In my opinion, the only way to make a meritocracy is by ensuring everyone has access to a mentor. Some people are naturally born with mentors from their family or network, and they start on an uneven playing field. But if everyone has a mentor who will guide and vouch for them, then it's really about execution - not where you were born or who you know.

Ashish Bhatt, Consultant @ L.E.K. Consulting

Ashish Bhatt

Mentorship is critical to succeed in the workplace, and it gives mentees access to company and industry knowledge trees. Throughout my career, mentors have helped me to develop frameworks to solve critical problems and avoid pitfalls / mistakes, saving time and money – two scarce resources. Unfortunately, many individuals and firms lack effective mentors and mentorship programs, hurting both employees and employers.

In my opinion, the only way to make a meritocracy is by ensuring everyone has access to a mentor. Some people are naturally born with mentors from their family or network, and they start on an uneven playing field. But if everyone has a mentor who will guide and vouch for them, then it's really about execution - not where you were born or who you know. You solve the asymmetry problem because everyone has access to the same information.

I joined Edith because to me it helps level the playing field. We can give students who weren't naturally born into families with extended networks the mentorship and support they need to succeed. I believe if we can democratize mentorship, then people's success will ultimately come down to execution and results rather than luck or family background.